TAAR1 gene

trace amine associated receptor 1

The information on this page was automatically extracted from online scientific databases.

From NCBI Gene:

The protein encoded by this gene is a G-protein coupled receptor activated by trace amines. The encoded protein responds little or not at all to dopamine, serotonin, epinephrine, or histamine, but responds well to beta-phenylethylamine, p-tyramine, octopamine, and tryptamine. While primarily functioning in neurologic systems, there is evidence that this gene is involved in blood cell and immunologic functions as well. This gene is thought to be intronless. [provided by RefSeq, Nov 2015]

From UniProt:

Receptor for trace amines, including beta-phenylethylamine (b-PEA), p-tyramine (p-TYR), octopamine and tryptamine, with highest affinity for b-PEA and p-TYR. Unresponsive to classical biogenic amines, such as epinephrine and histamine and only partially activated by dopamine and serotonin. Trace amines are biogenic amines present in very low levels in mammalian tissues. Although some trace amines have clearly defined roles as neurotransmitters in invertebrates, the extent to which they function as true neurotransmitters in vertebrates has remained speculative. Trace amines are likely to be involved in a variety of physiological functions that have yet to be fully understood. The signal transduced by this receptor is mediated by the G(s)-class of G-proteins which activate adenylate cyclase.

Cytogenetic Location: 6q23.2, which is the long (q) arm of chromosome 6 at position 23.2

Molecular Location: base pairs 132,644,898 to 132,646,026 on chromosome 6 (Homo sapiens Annotation Release 109, GRCh38.p12) (NCBI)

Cytogenetic Location: 6q23.2, which is the long (q) arm of chromosome 6 at position 23.2
  • TA1
  • TAR1
  • TRAR1