RP1 gene

retinitis pigmentosa 1 (autosomal dominant)

The information on this page was automatically extracted from online scientific databases.

From NCBI Gene:

This gene encodes a member of the doublecortin family. The protein encoded by this gene contains two doublecortin domains, which bind microtubules and regulate microtubule polymerization. The encoded protein is a photoreceptor microtubule-associated protein and is required for correct stacking of outer segment disc. This protein and the RP1L1 protein, another retinal-specific protein, play essential and synergistic roles in affecting photosensitivity and outer segment morphogenesis of rod photoreceptors. Because of its response to in vivo retinal oxygen levels, this protein was initially named ORP1 (oxygen-regulated protein-1). This protein was subsequently designated RP1 (retinitis pigmentosa 1) when it was found that mutations in this gene cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Mutations in this gene also cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa. Transcript variants resulted from an alternative promoter and alternative splicings have been found, which overlap the current reference sequence and has several exons upstream and downstream of the current reference sequence. However, the biological validity and full-length nature of some variants cannot be determined at this time.[provided by RefSeq, Sep 2010]

From UniProt:

Microtubule-associated protein regulating the stability and length of the microtubule-based axoneme of photoreceptors. Required for the differentiation of photoreceptor cells, it plays a role in the organization of the outer segment of rod and cone photoreceptors ensuring the correct orientation and higher-order stacking of outer segment disks along the photoreceptor axoneme.

Covered on Genetics Home Reference:

From NCBI Gene:

  • Retinitis pigmentosa 1

From UniProt:

Retinitis pigmentosa 1 (RP1): A retinal dystrophy belonging to the group of pigmentary retinopathies. Retinitis pigmentosa is characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination and primary loss of rod photoreceptor cells followed by secondary loss of cone photoreceptors. Patients typically have night vision blindness and loss of midperipheral visual field. As their condition progresses, they lose their far peripheral visual field and eventually central vision as well. [MIM:180100]

Cytogenetic Location: 8q12.1, which is the long (q) arm of chromosome 8 at position 12.1

Molecular Location: base pairs 54,509,448 to 54,630,834 on chromosome 8 (Homo sapiens Annotation Release 108, GRCh38.p7) (NCBI)

Cytogenetic Location: 8q12.1, which is the long (q) arm of chromosome 8 at position 12.1
  • DCDC4A
  • ORP1