RAPSN gene

receptor associated protein of the synapse

The RAPSN gene provides instructions for making a protein called rapsyn that attaches (binds) to the different parts (subunits) of a protein found in the muscle cell membrane called acetylcholine receptor (AChR). This binding helps keep the receptor subunits together and anchors the AChR protein in the muscle cell membrane. The AChR protein plays a critical role in the normal function of the neuromuscular junction. The neuromuscular junction is the area between the ends of nerve cells and muscle cells where signals are relayed to trigger muscle movement.

At least 45 mutations in the RAPSN gene have been found to cause congenital myasthenic syndrome. Most of these mutations change single protein building blocks (amino acids) in the rapsyn protein. A common mutation replaces the amino acid asparagine with the amino acid lysine at position 88 in the rapsyn protein (written as Asn88Lys or N88K). Most mutations in the RAPSN gene result in a reduction in functional rapsyn protein. The lack of rapsyn protein results in decreased binding between rapsyn and the AChR protein, which leads to disorganization of the receptor protein in the muscle cell membrane and a reduction in the number of receptors. As a result, signaling at the neuromuscular junction is decreased, which leads to decreased muscle movement and the muscle weakness characteristic of congenital myasthenic syndrome.

Genetics Home Reference provides information about multiple pterygium syndrome.

Cytogenetic Location: 11p11.2, which is the short (p) arm of chromosome 11 at position 11.2

Molecular Location: base pairs 47,437,757 to 47,449,178 on chromosome 11 (Homo sapiens Annotation Release 108, GRCh38.p7) (NCBI)

Cytogenetic Location: 11p11.2, which is the short (p) arm of chromosome 11 at position 11.2
  • RAPSN_HUMAN
  • RAPSYN
  • receptor-associated protein of the synapse
  • RING finger protein 205
  • RNF205