NAA10 gene

N(alpha)-acetyltransferase 10, NatA catalytic subunit

The information on this page was automatically extracted from online scientific databases.

From NCBI Gene:

N-alpha-acetylation is among the most common post-translational protein modifications in eukaryotic cells. This process involves the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-coenzyme A to the alpha-amino group on a nascent polypeptide and is essential for normal cell function. This gene encodes an N-terminal acetyltransferase that functions as the catalytic subunit of the major amino-terminal acetyltransferase A complex. Mutations in this gene are the cause of Ogden syndrome. Alternate splicing results in multiple transcript variants. [provided by RefSeq, Jan 2012]

From UniProt:

Catalytic subunit of the N-terminal acetyltransferase A (NatA) complex which displays alpha (N-terminal) acetyltransferase activity. The NAT activity may be important for vascular, hematopoietic and neuronal growth and development. Without NAA15, displays epsilon (internal) acetyltransferase activity towards HIF1A, thereby promoting its degradation. Represses MYLK kinase activity by acetylation, and thus represses tumor cell migration. Acetylates, and stabilizes TSC2, thereby repressing mTOR activity and suppressing cancer development.

From NCBI Gene:

  • N-terminal acetyltransferase deficiency
  • Lenz microphthalmia syndrome

From UniProt:

Microphthalmia, syndromic, 1 (MCOPS1): A rare syndrome defined by the canonical features of unilateral or bilateral microphthalmia or anophthalmia and defects in the skeletal and genitourinary systems. Microphthalmia is a disorder of eye formation, ranging from small size of a single eye to complete bilateral absence of ocular tissues (anophthalmia). In many cases, microphthalmia/anophthalmia occurs in association with syndromes that include non-ocular abnormalities. Anomalies of the digits, teeth, and ears are hallmarks of MCOPS1. Intellectual disability ranges from mild to severe, with self-mutilating behaviors and seizures in severely affected MCOPS1 individuals. [MIM:309800]

N-terminal acetyltransferase deficiency (NATD): An enzymatic deficiency resulting in postnatal growth failure with severe delays and dysmorphic features. It is clinically characterized by wrinkled forehead, prominent eyes, widely opened anterior and posterior fontanels, downsloping palpebral fissures, thickened lids, large ears, flared nares, hypoplastic alae, short columella, protruding upper lip, and microretrognathia. There are also delayed closing of fontanels and broad great toes. Skin is characterized by redundancy or laxity with minimal subcutaneous fat, cutaneous capillary malformations, and very fine hair and eyebrows. Death results from cardiogenic shock following arrhythmia. [MIM:300855]

Cytogenetic Location: Xq28, which is the long (q) arm of the X chromosome at position 28

Molecular Location: base pairs 153,929,827 to 153,935,154 on the X chromosome (Homo sapiens Annotation Release 108, GRCh38.p7) (NCBI)

Cytogenetic Location: Xq28, which is the long (q) arm of the X chromosome at position 28
  • ARD1
  • ARD1A
  • ARD1P
  • DXS707
  • MCOPS1
  • NATD
  • TE2