KISS1 gene

KiSS-1 metastasis-suppressor

The information on this page was automatically extracted from online scientific databases.

From NCBI Gene:

This gene is a metastasis suppressor gene that suppresses metastases of melanomas and breast carcinomas without affecting tumorigenicity. The encoded protein may inhibit chemotaxis and invasion and thereby attenuate metastasis in malignant melanomas. Studies suggest a putative role in the regulation of events downstream of cell-matrix adhesion, perhaps involving cytoskeletal reorganization. A protein product of this gene, kisspeptin, stimulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced gonadotropin secretion and regulates the pubertal activation of GnRH nuerons. A polymorphism in the terminal exon of this mRNA results in two protein isoforms. An adenosine present at the polymorphic site represents the third position in a stop codon. When the adenosine is absent, a downstream stop codon is utilized and the encoded protein extends for an additional seven amino acid residues. [provided by RefSeq, Mar 2012]

From UniProt:

Metastasis suppressor protein in malignant melanomas and in some breast cancers. May regulate events downstream of cell-matrix adhesion, perhaps involving cytoskeletal reorganization. Generates a C-terminally amidated peptide, metastin which functions as the endogenous ligand of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR54. Activation of the receptor inhibits cell proliferation and cell migration, key characteristics of tumor metastasis. Kp-10 is a decapeptide derived from the primary translation product, isolated in conditioned medium of first trimester trophoblast. Kp-10, but not other kisspeptins, increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels in isolated first trimester trophoblasts. Kp-10 is a paracrine/endocrine regulator in fine-tuning trophoblast invasion generated by the trophoblast itself. The receptor is also essential for normal gonadotropin-released hormone physiology and for puberty. The hypothalamic KiSS1/GPR54 system is a pivotal factor in central regulation of the gonadotropic axis at puberty and in adulthood.

From NCBI Gene:

  • Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism 13 with or without anosmia

From UniProt:

Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism 13 with or without anosmia (HH13): A disorder characterized by absent or incomplete sexual maturation by the age of 18 years, in conjunction with low levels of circulating gonadotropins and testosterone and no other abnormalities of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. In some cases, it is associated with non-reproductive phenotypes, such as anosmia, cleft palate, and sensorineural hearing loss. Anosmia or hyposmia is related to the absence or hypoplasia of the olfactory bulbs and tracts. Hypogonadism is due to deficiency in gonadotropin-releasing hormone and probably results from a failure of embryonic migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-synthesizing neurons. In the presence of anosmia, idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is referred to as Kallmann syndrome, whereas in the presence of a normal sense of smell, it has been termed normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nIHH). [MIM:614842]

Cytogenetic Location: 1q32, which is the long (q) arm of chromosome 1 at position 32

Molecular Location: base pairs 204,190,341 to 204,196,491 on chromosome 1 (Homo sapiens Annotation Release 108, GRCh38.p7) (NCBI)

Cytogenetic Location: 1q32, which is the long (q) arm of chromosome 1 at position 32
  • HH13
  • KiSS-1