CRYBB1 gene

crystallin beta B1

The information on this page was automatically extracted from online scientific databases.

From NCBI Gene:

Crystallins are separated into two classes: taxon-specific, or enzyme, and ubiquitous. The latter class constitutes the major proteins of vertebrate eye lens and maintains the transparency and refractive index of the lens. Since lens central fiber cells lose their nuclei during development, these crystallins are made and then retained throughout life, making them extremely stable proteins. Mammalian lens crystallins are divided into alpha, beta, and gamma families; beta and gamma crystallins are also considered as a superfamily. Alpha and beta families are further divided into acidic and basic groups. Seven protein regions exist in crystallins: four homologous motifs, a connecting peptide, and N- and C-terminal extensions. Beta-crystallins, the most heterogeneous, differ by the presence of the C-terminal extension (present in the basic group, none in the acidic group). Beta-crystallins form aggregates of different sizes and are able to self-associate to form dimers or to form heterodimers with other beta-crystallins. This gene, a beta basic group member, undergoes extensive cleavage at its N-terminal extension during lens maturation. It is also a member of a gene cluster with beta-A4, beta-B2, and beta-B3. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]

From UniProt:

Crystallins are the dominant structural components of the vertebrate eye lens.

From NCBI Gene:

  • Cataract, congenital nuclear, autosomal recessive 3

From UniProt:

Cataract 17, multiple types (CTRCT17): An opacification of the crystalline lens of the eye that frequently results in visual impairment or blindness. Opacities vary in morphology, are often confined to a portion of the lens, and may be static or progressive. In general, the more posteriorly located and dense an opacity, the greater the impact on visual function. CTRCT17 includes nuclear and pulverulent cataracts, among others. Nuclear cataracts affect the central nucleus of the eye, are often not highly visually significant. The density of the opacities varies greatly from fine dots to a dense, white and chalk-like, central cataract. The condition is usually bilateral. Nuclear cataracts are often combined with opacified cortical fibers encircling the nuclear opacity, which are referred to as cortical riders. Pulverulent cataracts are characterized by a dust-like, 'pulverised' appearance of the opacities which can be found in any part of the lens. [MIM:611544]

CRYBB1 mutations may be a cause of congenital cataract and microcornea syndrome, a disease characterized by the association of congenital cataract and microcornea without any other systemic anomaly or dysmorphism. Clinical findings include a corneal diameter inferior to 10 mm in both meridians in an otherwise normal eye, and an inherited cataract, which is most often bilateral posterior polar with opacification in the lens periphery. The cataract progresses to form a total cataract after visual maturity has been achieved, requiring cataract extraction in the first to third decade of life (PubMed:16110300 and PubMed:21972112).

Cytogenetic Location: 22q12.1, which is the long (q) arm of chromosome 22 at position 12.1

Molecular Location: base pairs 26,599,278 to 26,618,103 on chromosome 22 (Homo sapiens Annotation Release 108, GRCh38.p7) (NCBI)

Cytogenetic Location: 22q12.1, which is the long (q) arm of chromosome 22 at position 12.1
  • CATCN3
  • CTRCT17