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FGF8

FGF8

The information on this page was automatically extracted from online scientific databases.

What is the official name of the FGF8 gene?

The official name of this gene is “fibroblast growth factor 8 (androgen-induced).”

FGF8 is the gene's official symbol. The FGF8 gene is also known by other names, listed below.

Read more about gene names and symbols on the About page.

What is the normal function of the FGF8 gene?

From NCBI GeneThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference.:

The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family. FGF family members possess broad mitogenic and cell survival activities, and are involved in a variety of biological processes, including embryonic development, cell growth, morphogenesis, tissue repair, tumor growth and invasion. This protein is known to be a factor that supports androgen and anchorage independent growth of mammary tumor cells. Overexpression of this gene has been shown to increase tumor growth and angiogensis. The adult expression of this gene is restricted to testes and ovaries. Temporal and spatial pattern of this gene expression suggests its function as an embryonic epithelial factor. Studies of the mouse and chick homologs revealed roles in midbrain and limb development, organogenesis, embryo gastrulation and left-right axis determination. The alternative splicing of this gene results in four transcript variants. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]

From UniProtThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference.:

Plays an important role in the regulation of embryonic development, cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell migration. Required for normal brain, eye, ear and limb development during embryogenesis. Required for normal development of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal system.

How are changes in the FGF8 gene related to health conditions?

Genetics Home Reference provides information about nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly, which is associated with changes in the FGF8 gene.
NCBI GeneThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference. lists the following diseases or traits (phenotypes) known or believed to be associated with changes in the FGF8 gene.
  • Kallmann syndrome 6[1]This link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference.
UniProt and NCBI Gene cite these articles in OMIM, a catalog designed for genetics professionals and researchers that provides detailed information about genetic conditions and genes.
 Article
Number
Main Topic
[1]

Where is the FGF8 gene located?

Cytogenetic Location: 10q24

Molecular Location on chromosome 10: base pairs 101,770,129 to 101,780,368

The FGF8 gene is located on the long (q) arm of chromosome 10 at position 24.

The FGF8 gene is located on the long (q) arm of chromosome 10 at position 24.

More precisely, the FGF8 gene is located from base pair 101,770,129 to base pair 101,780,368 on chromosome 10.

See How do geneticists indicate the location of a gene? in the Handbook.

Where can I find additional information about FGF8?

You and your healthcare professional may find the following resources about FGF8 helpful.

You may also be interested in these resources, which are designed for genetics professionals and researchers.

What other names do people use for the FGF8 gene or gene products?

  • AIGF
  • FGF-8
  • HBGF-8
  • HH6
  • KAL6

Where can I find general information about genes?

The Handbook provides basic information about genetics in clear language.

These links provide additional genetics resources that may be useful.

What glossary definitions help with understanding FGF8?

 

The resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users seeking information about a personal genetic disease, syndrome, or condition should consult with a qualified healthcare professional. See How can I find a genetics professional in my area? in the Handbook.

 
Published: July 21, 2014