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DLEC1

DLEC1

The information on this page was automatically extracted from online scientific databases.

What is the official name of the DLEC1 gene?

The official name of this gene is “deleted in lung and esophageal cancer 1.”

DLEC1 is the gene's official symbol. The DLEC1 gene is also known by other names, listed below.

Read more about gene names and symbols on the About page.

What is the normal function of the DLEC1 gene?

From NCBI GeneThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference.:

This gene contains 37 exons, spans approximately 59-kb, and is located in the 3p22-p21.3 chromosomal segment that is commonly deleted in various carcinomas. Several alternatively spliced transcripts have been observed that contain disrupted coding regions and likely encode nonfunctional proteins. Aberrant transcription of this gene may be involved in carcinogenesis of the lung, esophagus, and kidney. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]

From UniProtThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference.:

May act as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell proliferation.

How are changes in the DLEC1 gene related to health conditions?

UniProtThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference. provides the following information about the DLEC1 gene's known or predicted involvement in human disease.

DLEC1 silencing due to promoter methylation and aberrant transcription are implicated in the development of different cancers, including esophageal (ESCR), renal and lung cancers (LNCR).

Lung cancer (LNCR): A common malignancy affecting tissues of the lung. The most common form of lung cancer is non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that can be divided into 3 major histologic subtypes: squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell lung cancer. NSCLC is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and has a poor prognosis. The gene represented in this entry may be involved in disease pathogenesis. DLEC1 silencing due to promoter methylation and aberrant transcription are implicated in the development of lung cancer.

Esophageal cancer (ESCR): A malignancy of the esophagus. The most common types are esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Cancer of the esophagus remains a devastating disease because it is usually not detected until it has progressed to an advanced incurable stage. The gene represented in this entry may be involved in disease pathogenesis. DLEC1 silencing due to promoter methylation and aberrant transcription may be implicated in the development of esophageal cancer.

NCBI GeneThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference. lists the following diseases or traits (phenotypes) known or believed to be associated with changes in the DLEC1 gene.
  • Lung cancer
  • Malignant tumor of esophagus
OMIM.orgThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference., a catalog designed for genetics professionals and researchers, provides the following information about the DLEC1 gene and its association with health conditions.
OMIM
Number
Title

Where is the DLEC1 gene located?

Cytogenetic Location: 3p21.3

Molecular Location on chromosome 3: base pairs 38,039,005 to 38,122,736

The DLEC1 gene is located on the short (p) arm of chromosome 3 at position 21.3.

The DLEC1 gene is located on the short (p) arm of chromosome 3 at position 21.3.

More precisely, the DLEC1 gene is located from base pair 38,039,005 to base pair 38,122,736 on chromosome 3.

See How do geneticists indicate the location of a gene? in the Handbook.

Where can I find additional information about DLEC1?

You may also be interested in these resources, which are designed for genetics professionals and researchers.

What other names do people use for the DLEC1 gene or gene products?

  • CFAP81
  • DLC1
  • F56

Where can I find general information about genes?

The Handbook provides basic information about genetics in clear language.

These links provide additional genetics resources that may be useful.

What glossary definitions help with understanding DLEC1?

adenocarcinoma ; cancer ; carcinoma ; cell ; cell proliferation ; esophagus ; gene ; kb ; kidney ; methylation ; prognosis ; proliferation ; promoter ; renal ; stage ; transcription ; tumor

You may find definitions for these and many other terms in the Genetics Home Reference Glossary.

See also Understanding Medical Terminology.

 

The resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users seeking information about a personal genetic disease, syndrome, or condition should consult with a qualified healthcare professional. See How can I find a genetics professional in my area? in the Handbook.

 
Published: February 23, 2015