Skip Navigation
Genetics Home Reference: your guide to understanding genetic conditions About   Site Map   Contact Us
 
Home A service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine®
 
 
Printer-friendly version
CCND1

CCND1

The information on this page was automatically extracted from online scientific databases.

What is the official name of the CCND1 gene?

The official name of this gene is “cyclin D1.”

CCND1 is the gene's official symbol. The CCND1 gene is also known by other names, listed below.

Read more about gene names and symbols on the About page.

What is the normal function of the CCND1 gene?

From NCBI GeneThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference.:

The protein encoded by this gene belongs to the highly conserved cyclin family, whose members are characterized by a dramatic periodicity in protein abundance throughout the cell cycle. Cyclins function as regulators of CDK kinases. Different cyclins exhibit distinct expression and degradation patterns which contribute to the temporal coordination of each mitotic event. This cyclin forms a complex with and functions as a regulatory subunit of CDK4 or CDK6, whose activity is required for cell cycle G1/S transition. This protein has been shown to interact with tumor suppressor protein Rb and the expression of this gene is regulated positively by Rb. Mutations, amplification and overexpression of this gene, which alters cell cycle progression, are observed frequently in a variety of tumors and may contribute to tumorigenesis. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]

From UniProtThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference.:

Regulatory component of the cyclin D1-CDK4 (DC) complex that phosphorylates and inhibits members of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein family including RB1 and regulates the cell-cycle during G(1)/S transition. Phosphorylation of RB1 allows dissociation of the transcription factor E2F from the RB/E2F complex and the subsequent transcription of E2F target genes which are responsible for the progression through the G(1) phase. Hypophosphorylates RB1 in early G(1) phase. Cyclin D-CDK4 complexes are major integrators of various mitogenenic and antimitogenic signals. Also substrate for SMAD3, phosphorylating SMAD3 in a cell-cycle-dependent manner and repressing its transcriptional activity. Component of the ternary complex, cyclin D1/CDK4/CDKN1B, required for nuclear translocation and activity of the cyclin D-CDK4 complex. Exhibits transcriptional corepressor activity with INSM1 on the NEUROD1 and INS promoters in a cell cycle-independent manner.

How are changes in the CCND1 gene related to health conditions?

UniProtThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference. provides the following information about the CCND1 gene's known or predicted involvement in human disease.

A chromosomal aberration involving CCND1 may be a cause of B-lymphocytic malignancy, particularly mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL). Translocation t(11;14)(q13;q32) with immunoglobulin gene regions. Activation of CCND1 may be oncogenic by directly altering progression through the cell cycle.

A chromosomal aberration involving CCND1 may be a cause of parathyroid adenomas. Translocation t(11;11)(q13;p15) with the parathyroid hormone (PTH) enhancer.

Multiple myeloma (MM): A malignant tumor of plasma cells usually arising in the bone marrow and characterized by diffuse involvement of the skeletal system, hyperglobulinemia, Bence-Jones proteinuria and anemia. Complications of multiple myeloma are bone pain, hypercalcemia, renal failure and spinal cord compression. The aberrant antibodies that are produced lead to impaired humoral immunity and patients have a high prevalence of infection. Amyloidosis may develop in some patients. Multiple myeloma is part of a spectrum of diseases ranging from monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) to plasma cell leukemia.[1]This link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference. The gene represented in this entry is involved in disease pathogenesis. A chromosomal aberration involving CCND1 is found in multiple myeloma. Translocation t(11;14)(q13;q32) with the IgH locus.

NCBI GeneThis link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference. lists the following diseases or traits (phenotypes) known or believed to be associated with changes in the CCND1 gene.
  • Multiple myeloma[1]This link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference.
  • Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome[2]This link leads to a site outside Genetics Home Reference.
UniProt and NCBI Gene cite these articles in OMIM, a catalog designed for genetics professionals and researchers that provides detailed information about genetic conditions and genes.
 Article
Number
Main Topic
[1]
[2]

Where is the CCND1 gene located?

Cytogenetic Location: 11q13

Molecular Location on chromosome 11: base pairs 69,641,104 to 69,654,473

The CCND1 gene is located on the long (q) arm of chromosome 11 at position 13.

The CCND1 gene is located on the long (q) arm of chromosome 11 at position 13.

More precisely, the CCND1 gene is located from base pair 69,641,104 to base pair 69,654,473 on chromosome 11.

See How do geneticists indicate the location of a gene? in the Handbook.

Where can I find additional information about CCND1?

You and your healthcare professional may find the following resources about CCND1 helpful.

You may also be interested in these resources, which are designed for genetics professionals and researchers.

What other names do people use for the CCND1 gene or gene products?

  • BCL1
  • D11S287E
  • PRAD1
  • U21B31

Where can I find general information about genes?

The Handbook provides basic information about genetics in clear language.

These links provide additional genetics resources that may be useful.

What glossary definitions help with understanding CCND1?

 

The resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users seeking information about a personal genetic disease, syndrome, or condition should consult with a qualified healthcare professional. See How can I find a genetics professional in my area? in the Handbook.

 
Published: September 29, 2014